Establishment of primary cell lines from tissues of the red-eared slider

  • Maria Kulak Chromas Research Resource Center of Saint Petersburg State University Research Park, Oranienbaumskoye Shosse, 2, Stary Peterhof, Saint Petersburg, 198504, Russian Federation https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1204-4524
  • Svetlana Galkina Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Saint Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya nab., 7–9, Saint Petersburg, 199034, Russian Federation https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7034-2466
  • Alsu Saifitdinova Department of Human and Animal Anatomy and Physiology, Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, Moyka nab., 48, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1221-479X
  • Elena Gaginskaya Department of Cytology and Histology, Saint Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya nab., 7–9, Saint Petersburg, 199034, Russian Federation https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4967-9053

Abstract

Primary cell lines of the red-eared slider were established from somatic slider tissues cultivated in appropriate medium for a certain period. Exponential cell growth started after 2 weeks of continuous cultivating. The cells were of various morphology resembling keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and melanocytes, some of them gathered to form dense conglomerates similar to so-called “embryoid bodies”. The cell lines were maintained for 3–7 passages before being taken for cytogenetic manipulations. Red-eared slider cell lines derived in this way can be cryopreserved and successfully recovered to provide a source of fixed cells for 3D imaging as well as a source of chromosomes and chromatin fiber preparations for cytological and cytogenetic studies. The protocol for red-eared slider cells was developed on the basis of the experiments described.

Keywords:

Trachemys scripta elegans, turtles, primary culture, explant

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References

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Published
2020-01-23
How to Cite
Kulak, M., Galkina, S., Saifitdinova, A., & Gaginskaya, E. (2020). Establishment of primary cell lines from tissues of the red-eared slider. Biological Communications, 64(4), 229–234. https://doi.org/10.21638/spbu03.2019.401
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